Internal Medicine

/Internal Medicine
Internal Medicine 2017-08-31T18:50:27+00:00

Internal Medicine

We specialize in diagnosing and treating serious or chronic veterinary disorders and systemic conditions. Our internists rely on a wide array of blood tests to ascertain the cause of your pet’s illness—as well as digital radiography, endoscopy and ultrasound.

Minimally invasive procedure include foreign body retrieval (esophagus, stomach, nose, vagina), feeding tube placement (esophageal, stomach) and dilation of strictures.

Get Internal Medicine Procedure Details

Bronchoscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to assess the airway and lungs for signs of inflammation, infection, or even foreign material. It also allows the doctor to look for signs of tracheal or bronchial collapse, as well as place a stent (wire mesh tube that prevents collapse or constriction of diseased tissues), if indicated.

Once the patient has been anesthetized and intubated, the scope is advanced through the patient’s mouth and down the trachea. The trachea and bronchial airways are assessed for collapse, soft tissue masses, inflammation, and signs of infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage can be performed by squirting saline into the bronchi and suctioning it back up to retrieve a sample to be submitted to a pathologist to look for infectious agents. Brush cytology may also be performed to obtain cell samples from the bronchi for pathologist analysis. If there is airway collapse present, measurements can be taken in preparation for stent placement, which would be performed during a separate anesthetic procedure. Due to the minimally invasive method of bronchoscopy, these patients usually go home the same day. They are likely to be groggy from the anesthesia, and food and water should be given in small amounts upon returning home to prevent regurgitation.

Endoscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to explore the gastrointestinal system. It is used to look for signs of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or cancer, and to take biopsies to obtain a diagnosis. Endoscopy may also be used to retrieve foreign material from the stomach or small intestine, however if the material is too large or has progressed farther down the digestive tract, open abdominal exploratory surgery is necessary.

Once the patient has been anesthetized and intubated, the scope is advanced through the patient’s mouth and down the esophagus. The esophagus, pylorus, stomach, and duodenum are assessed for any structural abnormalities, masses, or inflammation. Biopsies of these areas are obtained for analysis by a pathologist. If foreign material is seen, retrieval is attempted using various attachments with the endoscope. Due to the minimally invasive method of endoscopy, these patients usually go home the same day. They are likely to be groggy from the anesthesia, and food and water should be given in small amounts upon returning home to prevent regurgitation. Procedures include edoscopic scoping to access:

  • Stomach
  • Colon
  • Nose
  • Bladder
  • Small intestine
  • Windpipe and airways
  • Urethra
  • Vagina
Rhinoscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used to examine the nasal passages for signs of inflammation, cancer, or fungal infection. A CT (cat) scan or radiographs are performed prior to the procedure to assess for bone destruction of the nasal cavity. Biopsies of the nasal tissue are collected and submitted for analysis and diagnosis by a pathologist to aid in follow up treatment.

Once the patient is anesthetized and intubated, retrograde rhinoscopy is performed by placing the flexible scope in the patient’s mouth and bending it upwards to view the choana (back of the nasal cavity), looking for soft tissue masses, foreign material, inflammation or discharge. Antegrade rhinoscopy is then performed by placing the scope into each nostril, also looking for masses, foreign material, inflammation, discharge, and turbinate destruction (damage to the cartilaginous structure of the nasal passage). Biopsies are obtained to provide a diagnosis and recommendation for follow-up treatment. Fungal plaques may be visible in the nasal cavity. Anti-fungal treatment is typically performed during a future procedure after the diagnosis is confirmed by biopsy. In rare cases, turbinate damage may be so severe that a nasal stent (wire mesh tube) is needed to prevent collapse/constriction of these tissues and allow adequate air flow through the nasal passages. Due to the minimally invasive method of rhinoscopy, these patients usually go home the same day. They are likely to be groggy from the anesthesia, and food and water should be given in small amounts upon returning home to prevent regurgitation. They may also have nose bleeds for up to 24 hours after the procedure, so careful monitoring at home is recommended. 

  • Abdominal ultrasound
  • Chemotherapy of common cancers (lymphoma, mast cell tumors, osteosarcoma, hemagiosarcoma)
  • Management of complex medical cases
  • Hormonal testing
  • Bone marrow aspirates
  • Joint taps
  • CT scans